The Banks of the Rubicon

Jake Davis
6 min readJul 12, 2021

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Julius Caesar is probably the most famous leader in History. Widely known for such innovations as the Appian Way, the Modern Calendar, and Seigeworx. His most notable act, the conquering of the Gallic Tribes and England (which led him to chase down his comrades Pompeii, to conquer Egypt, and Cassius, to conquer the rest of the Mediterranean Gulf, and kill or force to suicide them.), yielded the most noted battle in history. Remembered for the technical superiority in the manner for which Caesar captured the Gallic Chieftan Vercingetorix (pronounced: Ver-sin-GET-or-ix). Julius Caesar marched his armies from Rome on the central west coast of what we now call Italy, across the Roman Alps (the frozen barrier of mountains separating the Italian Peninsula from Germany) into Europe to hint the barbarians who were raiding the Tuscan farming villages that supplied Rome with grain and meat. The first obstacle they met was the Rhine river, were Caesar had his men construct a wood bridge from the trees around them. They crossed and took the pontoon flotilla bridge up with the last men across each section.

They then began to conquest through the vastly outnumbered tribes of the Gauls which spread from modern Portugal to Poland, the entire continent of Europe. His intelligence officers found rumor of a Chieftain named Vercingetorix. Their intel was meant to lead them to the most cunning Chieftain that the Gallic tribesmen had to offer. The chased him to a city centered just northwest of what is now Dijon, France known as Alesia.

There the armies of Caesar surrounded the city with walls, trenches, spikes, and seigeworx (Archer towers, ballista, trebuchet {named for the region in which Caesar developed the weapon}, and catapults). But some of Vercingetorix’s men escaped to get reinforcements, so he had his men construct another series of walls, trenches, spikes, and seigeworx around themselves. The waiting game began.

Photo by Anna Church on Unsplash

Caesars army would be outnumbered, since his intelligence tactic only wanted to show a supremacy. This was a direct relation to the days of his youth, when as a soldier he won decisive battles against Greece (One of the reasons Caesar made the Calendar have a code…

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Jake Davis

Owner of two @Medium Publications: @WewoChro & @CoinOfferings